Rich Dionne
  • Male
  • West Lafayette, IN
  • United States
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Jeffrey Dobbs commented on Rich Dionne's blog post How to Build It (or, Drawing for the Shop You Have)
"Running parts "wild" that are not seen, I have found easier to built, especially when there are compound angles to deal with. It looks so easy on CAD, so precise, but not in the building process, considering the tools available and the…"
Oct 7, 2013
Larry Vigus commented on Rich Dionne's blog post How to Build It (or, Drawing for the Shop You Have)
"That's how we always did it in television and film so the ceiling could be "wild" if needed for lighting or other shots.   This gives you flexibility and provides the most opportunities for attachment and adjustment."
Aug 26, 2013
Brian Wolfe commented on Rich Dionne's blog post How to Build It (or, Drawing for the Shop You Have)
"Agreed."
Aug 26, 2013
Rich Dionne's blog post was featured

It Looks Like This is the End...

I'm sitting in the house at the Dorset Theatre Festival as my crew finishes applying molding and other detail touches to the set for Clybourne Park, our last show of the season. This production was coproduced with Barrington Stage in Massachusetts, and as part of the cost-sharing discussion, we decided it would be smart to split the physical labor--have some of the set built by our shop here, and some built in the shop at Barrington.There were a lot of reasons to split the construction; time,…See More
Aug 16, 2013
Rich Dionne posted a blog post

It Looks Like This is the End...

I'm sitting in the house at the Dorset Theatre Festival as my crew finishes applying molding and other detail touches to the set for Clybourne Park, our last show of the season. This production was coproduced with Barrington Stage in Massachusetts, and as part of the cost-sharing discussion, we decided it would be smart to split the physical labor--have some of the set built by our shop here, and some built in the shop at Barrington.There were a lot of reasons to split the construction; time,…See More
Aug 16, 2013
Rich Dionne's blog post was featured

How to Build It (or, Drawing for the Shop You Have)

I found myself staring at a designer drawing of a simple porch column the other day: about 14' tall, with a 3'-tall brick base and a tapered square profile above. I started drawing it, and then stopped. I was stuck--thinking about different views, different construction techniques, different material choices. It was a little frustrating, frankly, but not all that uncommon: I often find myself spending a lot of mental energy thinking about how to build a piece of scenery--even the seemingly…See More
Aug 9, 2013
Rich Dionne posted a blog post

How to Build It (or, Drawing for the Shop You Have)

I found myself staring at a designer drawing of a simple porch column the other day: about 14' tall, with a 3'-tall brick base and a tapered square profile above. I started drawing it, and then stopped. I was stuck--thinking about different views, different construction techniques, different material choices. It was a little frustrating, frankly, but not all that uncommon: I often find myself spending a lot of mental energy thinking about how to build a piece of scenery--even the seemingly…See More
Aug 9, 2013
Rich Dionne commented on Richelle Thompson's blog post All Over But the Strike... (And why is it called strike, anyway?)
"I have to imagine that the phrase, "strike the set," dates back to when sailors were hired as riggers: "strike the sail" means to lower the sail, or remove it from use."
Aug 9, 2013
Robert Durie commented on Rich Dionne's blog post Oh boy...Another Oversized Crown Molding...
"I have been using foam moldings for 25 years and I cut it myself using a hot wire cutter made from a coat hanger bent in the needed profile. With the use of available construction adhesives. The cost of 12x12x 15 feet blocks of foam can sometimes…"
Aug 6, 2013
KEN BERNSTEIN commented on Rich Dionne's blog post How to be an Intern
"Rich, This is a really good post that all perspective interns should read.  But  I would add #6 Learn the 5 things above and follow them every day of your career.  I have been doing this for over 4 decades and I still try to learn…"
Aug 5, 2013
Rich Dionne commented on Rich Dionne's blog post Oh boy...Another Oversized Crown Molding...
"Ken, I agree with using backing plates and building a sufficient structure in the framing of the backing flat when using wood/built-up crown, but I have to disagree when using foam; it's simply not required because the weights involved are so…"
Aug 5, 2013
KEN BERNSTEIN commented on Rich Dionne's blog post Oh boy...Another Oversized Crown Molding...
"Styrofoam moldings are great and it sounds like the prices have come down. but if you do do them out of wood or even styrofoam, you should always plan structure in your walls to attach to.  It is never a good idea to attach only to luaun unless…"
Aug 5, 2013
Rich Dionne commented on Rich Dionne's blog post Oh boy...Another Oversized Crown Molding...
"Douglas, The company I've been using here in Vermont is J. E. McLaughlin, in Rutland, Vermont. They're very helpful and great to work with. All they need is a dimensioned drawing of the molding profile, and you're good to go. If you…"
Aug 2, 2013
Douglas Fox commented on Rich Dionne's blog post Oh boy...Another Oversized Crown Molding...
"It would be helpful to know the company used to custom craft these shapes."
Aug 2, 2013
Rich Dionne's blog post was featured

Oh boy...Another Oversized Crown Molding...

Three quarters of the productions at Dorset Theatre Festival this summer have been architecturally-real box sets (not atypical for this company). One fairly standard feature for these kinds of sets is the oversized crown molding: typically the profile for molding like this is something like nine inches to a foot tall by six to nine inches wide, and features a couple of different curves and breaks to create shadow lines. Our three architecturally-real sets are no exception, all three have…See More
Aug 2, 2013
Rich Dionne posted a blog post

Oh boy...Another Oversized Crown Molding...

Three quarters of the productions at Dorset Theatre Festival this summer have been architecturally-real box sets (not atypical for this company). One fairly standard feature for these kinds of sets is the oversized crown molding: typically the profile for molding like this is something like nine inches to a foot tall by six to nine inches wide, and features a couple of different curves and breaks to create shadow lines. Our three architecturally-real sets are no exception, all three have…See More
Aug 2, 2013

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What's the last show you worked on?
Amadeus
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Yes

Rich Dionne's Blog

It Looks Like This is the End...

I'm sitting in the house at the Dorset Theatre Festival as my crew finishes applying molding and other detail touches to the set for Clybourne Park, our last show of the season. This production was coproduced with Barrington Stage in Massachusetts, and as part of the cost-sharing discussion, we decided it would be smart to split the physical labor--have some of the set built by our shop here, and some built in the shop at Barrington.

There were a lot of reasons to…

Continue

Posted on August 16, 2013 at 6:58am

How to Build It (or, Drawing for the Shop You Have)

I found myself staring at a designer drawing of a simple porch column the other day: about 14' tall, with a 3'-tall brick base and a tapered square profile above. I started drawing it, and then stopped. I was stuck--thinking about different views, different construction techniques, different material choices. It was a little frustrating, frankly, but not all that uncommon: I often find myself spending a lot of mental energy thinking about how to build a piece of scenery--even the seemingly…

Continue

Posted on August 9, 2013 at 11:34am — 3 Comments

Oh boy...Another Oversized Crown Molding...

Three quarters of the productions at Dorset Theatre Festival this summer have been architecturally-real box sets (not atypical for this company). One fairly standard feature for these kinds of sets is the oversized crown molding: typically the profile for molding like this is something like nine inches to a foot tall by six to nine inches wide, and features a couple of different curves and breaks to create shadow lines. Our three architecturally-real sets are no exception, all three have… Continue

Posted on August 2, 2013 at 5:15am — 5 Comments

Wait...They'll be Barefoot? Or, A Show About Shoes

Last weekend, during the load in of our production of Barefoot in the Park at Dorset Theatre Festival, the costume designer came up to the theatre and asked if she could slap some shoes down onto the stage floor to see how they sounded. The actors had been wearing their costume shoes in rehearsal, and as they sounded very load on the hardwood floor of the rehearsal room, there was some concern they'd be loud on stage as well. If they were going to be, this would probably mean a trip to the… Continue

Posted on July 26, 2013 at 5:37am

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